Parents and Educators: find resources for at-home and distance learning

8

90 minutes
4

7 / 8
Mathematics, Science

In this lesson, students learn that framing our energy habits and choices in terms of a “carbon footprint” can help us understand our individual impact on the global environment. They conduct a personal eco-audit to investigate how their own energy usage results in carbon being released into the atmosphere. After tracking their habits for one 24-hour period, students calculate their personal carbon footprint and then compare the results to averages for other countries and communities. As students frame their choices in a global context and come to understand the importance of making sustainable choices for a healthier future, they also look for ways to support each other and create exciting and innovative changes for the future.

What are some ways you can apply the zero-waste philosophy in your daily life?
55 minutes
0

7 / 8
Science

In this lesson, students learn how the simple act of composting their plant-based wastes can help create a sustainable future in several vital ways. They take a microscopic look at a variety of soil samples to identify the characteristics of healthy and unhealthy soils. Along the way, they learn the value of topsoil, why it is threatened, and what they can do to help protect it.

80 minutes
0

7 / 8
Science

In this lesson, students learn how much waste the average person produces and think about how their own daily waste production compares to that average. Then they spend 24 hours collecting all the (nonhazardous) wastes they personally generate. Next, students inventory and log their results and reflect on how their waste production compares to the global average. Students also make a list of the electronic items they own or have owned and consider their personal role in managing e-wastes responsibly.

50 minutes
0

7 / 8
Science

In this lesson, students examine how traditional thinking about waste management has created a global waste management crisis. Then they learn how a new way of thinking—zero-waste thinking—offers hope for the future. They review how the 5Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle, rot, reflect) can help communities develop a zero-waste mindset. Finally, students are challenged to put what they’ve learned into practice by implementing a zero-waste initiative at the school.

30 minutes
0

7 / 8
Science

The Personal Water Eco-Audit is the first lesson in a three-lesson module on human water use and its impacts on the environment. In this lesson, students determine how much water they personally use in a day, a month, and a year, and in so doing they apply math skills in a real-life, meaningful way. They also learn about the implications of their water use as they study principles of water conservation.

110 minutes
0

7 / 8
Civics and Government, Science

In this final lesson of a three-lesson series, students learn about how common household items can lead to pollution when those items enter our water system. Students build a model of a water infrastructure and then play a game to simulate how various activities impact water infrastructure. The class ends with students reflecting on alternative actions they might take to reduce a negative impact on water infrastructure.

160 minutes
0

7 / 8
Science

This lesson is the second of a three-lesson module on human water use and its impacts on the environment. In this lesson, students learn about contaminants and impurities that can cause water to become undrinkable for humans and unlivable for marine life. They collect samples from local natural water sources; they then work in teams to investigate the quality of the water they sampled and make connections between their results and nearby natural and human activities.

Why do you think you use more or less water than the national average?