Parents and Educators: find resources for at-home and distance learning

8

65 minutes
0

7 / 8
Mathematics

In this lesson, students conduct an eco-audit to see how much carbon dioxide their personal transportation habits contribute to the atmosphere during a period of one week. They analyze the results, put those results into perspective, and then plan simple actions they can take to reduce their personal impact on the environment.

What is air quality, and how does it relate to air pollution?
45 minutes
0

7 / 8
Science

This lesson encourages students to explore the information on air quality for their town or neighborhood. Students visit a website and analyze data on the levels of key air pollutants, as well as environmental factors that influence air pollution. They then think critically about the information they’ve collected. This activity works well when done by the whole class or small groups or by individuals as a homework assignment. It is also great preparation for the personal air audit.

What is biodiversity, and why is it important?
50 minutes
0

7 / 8
Civics and Government

In this lesson, students reflect on public spaces that have impacted them in some way. They consider how public spaces give humans much-needed places for social activities, for enjoying nature, and for physical exercise. They recall a variety of public spaces they have experienced and conduct a plus/delta analysis to analyze the positive and negative aspects of familiar public spaces. After these personal reflections, they join classmates in reviewing and discussing which aspects of public spaces work well and which do not work well. They note trends among their personal reflections and begin outlining ideas for improving public spaces. The ideas on the Extend tab then provide opportunities for students to take action to improve a public space in their area.

What do I eat, and where does it come from?
80 minutes
5

7 / 8
Mathematics, Science

In this lesson, students undertake a personal mission to explore their food habits. They track everything they eat for seven days, categorize the types of foods they ate, and then analyze the habits and trends they spot. Next, students explore the concept of a foodprint, or an assessment of how choosing to eat the foods we eat impacts the environment, particularly in terms of the carbon emissions that result from producing, processing, and transporting that food. Students then investigate how they can improve their foodprints by making more sustainable food choices.

What can a carbon footprint tell me about the impact my actions have on the environment?
150 minutes
0

7 / 8
Science

In this lesson, students learn about alternatives to fossil-fuel energy resources. They take on a challenge from the community’s “mayor” to serve on an Energy Task Force and research whether the most common alternative energy resources are appropriate for their community. Working in groups, they research five alternative energy sources and present their findings to the mayor. Then the groups evaluate the experience and the implications that each of these technologies has for both their local community and the larger global community.

50 minutes
4

7 / 8
Civics and Government

In this lesson, students consider the various ways we illuminate our world. They conduct a scientific experiment to determine how much thermal energy various types of lightbulbs emit and consider the pros and cons of each light source. When they see that some types of bulbs are far more energy efficient than others, they consider the environmental implications of those more efficient options—hazardous waste. As students review the cost, energy use, lifespan, and disposal requirements of different kinds of bulbs, they learn that making thoughtful, considered choices about the products we use is an important aspect of sustainable intelligence.