Parents and Educators: find resources for at-home and distance learning

8

55 minutes
5

7 / 8
Environmental Education, Physical Education

In this lesson, students put together a hypothetical meal by choosing three or more food items from a list of several. Then they take a closer look at the items they've chosen in order to learn more about the artificial additives, food dyes, sugar, and GMOs contained within those foods. After their analysis, students reevaluate just how “nutritious” their delicious meal really is.

165 minutes
5

7 / 8
Environmental Education, Science

In this lesson, students learn how biotechnology has led to advances in agricultural science that are changing the world. Not the least of these changes is the increasing number of genetically modified foods in markets around the world. Students explore how genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are resulting in incredible advances in food nutrition, availability, and adaptability and may one day help eliminate world hunger. They also learn that some governments and many consumers have serious concerns about this technology, and they explore some of the reasons for those concerns. Rather than telling students what to think about this issue, the lesson encourages students to research the topic, debate with their peers, and make up their own minds. The lesson concludes with a discussion designed to help students synthesize their thoughts on the topic.

30 minutes
5

6 / 7 / 8
Career and Technical Education (CTE): STEM, Mathematics, Reading or Language Arts, Science

This lesson engages students as real-life data sleuths to find out how their homes measure water and energy use. After discussing the social and environmental purposes and processes of measuring usage, students learn about different types of meters, then investigate their own home and/or school building to assess which meters are in use.

380 minutes
0

Kindergarten / 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8
Reading or Language Arts

Developing a sense of place is one piece of the puzzle in making our schools with a focus on sustainability.
– David Sobel, Mapmaking with Children (1998)

In this series of activities, students reflect on their relationship with their community and how their place contributes to the health and safety of all citizens. By completing various mapping and special place reflection activities, students define their neighborhood and community. Students gain a sense of where they live, are prepared to create tools for evaluating their neighborhood, and have the ability to identify problems or concerns that need improvement.

Essential Questions

  • What is special about my place?
  • Why should I care about our place?
  • How am I connected to my place?
  • What can I do to make my place safer and healthier for all citizens?
Why is soil a valuable resource?
How do paved areas impact the filtration of rainwater?
165 minutes
4

6 / 7 / 8
Science

In this lesson, students learn the value of clean freshwater and the natural processes that ensure an adequate supply of usable freshwater. In activity 2, students conduct a hands-on activity that focuses on the role of natural areas as filters that produce clean water. Such natural filters are contrasted with impervious (paved) areas to compare the impact of development on the ability of nature to provide clean freshwater.

150 minutes
4

6 / 7 / 8
Science

In this lesson, students learn the value of clean freshwater and the natural processes that ensure an adequate supply of usable freshwater. In activity 1, students learn about the importance of water quality for human health and agriculture. Students brainstorm the different ways that people use water, from household use to industry and agriculture. Statistics related to the quantity of water on the planet help students understand that water is a finite resource. Students relate their own activities to the water supply to put their own consumption in activities. Students then brainstorm various threats to the water supply.

165 minutes
4

5 / 6 / 7 / 8
Science

In this lesson, students learn about the value of soil as a natural resource (regulates water, sustains plant and animal life, filters pollutants, cycles nutrients and supports structures). Then explore the importance of having/maintaining healthy soil. They will explore different individuals’ descriptions of healthy soil. For example, to an agriculturalist, healthy soil means highly productive land that sustains or enhances productivity therefore enhancing profits; to a consumer it means plentiful, healthy and inexpensive food for present and future generations; to an environmentalist it means functioning at its potential in an ecosystem with respect to biodiversity, water quality, nutrient cycling, and biomass production.

How do my personal transportation habits impact the environment?