Parents and Educators: find resources for at-home and distance learning

6

90 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8
Environmental Education, Science

In this lesson, students distinguish between a wildfire and a controlled burn, also known as a prescribed fire. They explore multiple controlled burn scenarios. They explain the positive impacts of fire on ecosystems (e.g., reduce hazardous fuels, dispose of logging debris, prepare sites for seeding/planting, improve wildlife habitat, manage competing vegetation, control insects and disease, improve forage for grazing, enhance appearance, improve access, perpetuate fire-dependent species) and compare and contrast how organisms in different ecosystems have adapted to fire.

100 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8
Civics and Government

The internal threats institutionalized in the Constitution triggered a power dynamic, a class struggle for power and control, that continues to shape our society. This lesson examines three large-scale shifts in the balance of power after the Civil War. It explores why these shifts occur, who is driving the dynamic, and the growing social and political consequences of this power imbalance at the core of our democracy. Students reflect on the democracy journey and create their own narrative of who rules.

100 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8
Civics and Government

Students critically examine the conceptual framework of the Constitution and Bill of Rights to understand how internal threats institutionalized in these documents triggered a power dynamic that has shaped our society from inception to present. Students are introduced to a third entity that existed at the time of founding – corporations – and then explore the young government’s dilemma of where to fit this entity into the legal framework. Students critically examine “judicial review,” two other early landmark laws, and the Civil War Amendments and the effects of these on the balance of rights, powers, and privilege during the first 100 years of the democracy journey.

100 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8
Civics and Government

Lesson 2 introduces a basic tool of civic engagement – the concept that our rights, and the government created to secure our rights, is derived from what we value and love. Students explore and articulate what they value, then organize their values into types of shared wealth. Students identify shared wealth as civic values enshrined in founding documents and codified into law under the Bill of Rights. Using current events, students learn how, and how well, our rights work to defend our wealth and wellbeing against government abuses of power. This lesson is critical to sustaining effective action on any issue.

180 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Environmental Education

Celebrate all that you’ve accomplished over the course of the week alongside some new friends from across the country.

300 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Environmental Education

Set goals for yourself by considering input from your peers, creating an advocacy plan, and shooting a short video to explain your next steps.

330 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Environmental Education

Apply your knowledge by getting out into your neighborhood, photographing and writing about what you see, and proposing a few changes you think would make it better.

330 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Environmental Education

Deepen your knowledge by learning how city planners and leaders make decisions, researching what your city or town has been doing, and refining your city model based on what you’ve learned.

360 minutes
0

6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Environmental Education

Get inspired by exploring sustainable cities around the world, understanding what makes them special, and building your own city model.

What is the connection between sustainable city planning and climate change mitigation?