5

What are some valuable services that ships and airlines provide?
50 minutes
0

5 / 6
Civics and Government, Mathematics

In this lesson, students explore the benefits and consequences of two popular transportation industries: shipping and air travel. While both industries are clearly important to the global economy, they also have a significant impact on the environment, particularly by contributing greenhouse gases that are having negative impacts on our global climate. Students explore ways that governments and industries are improving their practices and addressing environmental concerns. Then students work in teams to consider several scenarios in which individuals and families evaluate the options they have for travel. Students also explore purchasing carbon credits and other actions they can take to help address this significant environmental issue.

What is air?
50 minutes
0

5 / 6
Science

In this lesson, students learn that in some parts of the world, people hear air quality alerts and warnings regularly. The problem is getting worse as the human population increases, making air quality a significant global issue. Students examine how an index of air quality is one way governments monitor and communicate with the public about air pollution and its potential health effects. Then students conduct a quick walk-through eco-audit of their classroom to see if there are changes they can make to improve the air quality within their immediate environment. Students reflect upon how their actions (even in a community with consistently good air quality) can have an impact on the entire atmosphere, and then they brainstorm things they can do personally and as a class to help alleviate air pollution. The ideas on the Extend tab offer multiple strategies students can use to implement their ideas and take them into the community to spread awareness and encourage further change.

What is natural and cultural heritage?
120 minutes
0

5 / 6
Arts, Career and Technical Education (CTE), Civics and Government

In this lesson, students discover what it means for a city to be “green” and learn how green cities around the world are serving as models for sustainable human development. Students examine principles of green urbanization and look at outstanding examples of green cities around the world. With the goal of moving toward a more sustainable future, students then work in teams to envision how their city could become green (or greener), develop a plan based on that vision, and use their plan to create a model, sketches, or blueprints that show what their improved community could look like.

Where does my food come from?
110 minutes
0

5 / 6
Civics and Government, History, Science

In the first session of the lesson, students delve into the history of agriculture to learn about how humans have fed themselves over the last few thousand years. They also discover that agriculture has changed dramatically in the last few decades, producing a Green Revolution that has had positive and negative effects. Students then explore key elements of sustainable agriculture and how it has been used successfully for thousands of years. In the second session, students are challenged to synthesize and apply what they’ve learned as they role-play delegates from the United Nations. They work in teams to analyze the specific circumstances of their assigned nation and then recommend either that their nation’s leaders sign or do not sign a treaty committing their nation to using 60 percent sustainable farming methods by 2030.

Why do we extract fossil fuels and minerals from Earth’s crust when there are so many adverse consequences?
100 minutes
0

5 / 6
Science

In this lesson, students explore the ways in which humans use hydropower to fuel society. First, they learn how we harness hydropower to generate electricity, and then they build a hydropaddle to simulate a turbine. Next, they examine the pros and cons of hydropower by choosing an issue, conducting an investigative analysis to discover a story of real-life impact, and sharing that story with the class. Students also reflect upon why facts alone are often not enough to communicate the importance of sustainability issues; asking questions and doing research can often lead to surprising changes in perspective and new understandings.