Parents and Educators: find resources for at-home and distance learning

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50 minutes
0

3 / 4
Science

The 3Rs: Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle are commonly used to help people remember to be responsible with their waste. In this lesson, students expand the 3Rs to the 5Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Rot, and Reflect. The term rot helps them remember the importance of composting. Students explore the term reflect to learn how to be aware of and question their personal behaviors and more global issues related to waste. Students demonstrate what they learned by working together to create a set of posters they can share around the community. In this way, they also learn how to be advocates for social change.

100 minutes
0

3 / 4
Arts, Science

In this lesson, students learn the difference between organic garbage (which comes from natural sources and readily degrades) and inorganic garbage (which comes from human-made sources and can take a very long time to degrade). They learn the value of sorting different types of wastes so that those wastes can more easily be managed in a sustainable way. Finally, students make recycling bins and learn advocacy skills as they educate the school community about the purpose and value of the bins.

115 minutes
4.5

3 / 4
Civics and Government, Science

In this lesson, students learn that waste does not just go away after it is thrown in a trash can; it ends up in a landfill or a dump, or it is burned. Each of these systems solves the problem of getting the waste out of sight, but each also creates new problems along the way. As a result, many communities are adopting a zero-waste vision for the future, which involves rethinking how much waste we create and what happens to it. Students explore these concepts and how waste is handled differently in different places. Then they conduct a scientific simulation of a landfill to answer this question: Which kind of waste lasts longer in a landfill—organic waste or inorganic waste?

Why should we be concerned about what happens to our waste?
50 minutes
0

3 / 4
Environmental Education, Science

Students begin this lesson by learning about the water cycle. Then they use the pH scale to test common household substances to learn their pH values. They learn that pure water has a pH of around 7, that anything above this level is considered basic, and that anything below this level is acidic. Students see how certain substances can end up in freshwater resources and cause that water to become too acidic or too basic, which harms living things in the water. They also conduct an experiment to see how water can evaporate and carry pollutants with it. Those pollutants can lead to acid rain, which is extremely harmful. The lesson ends with students hearing a story and discussing actions they can take to help keep our water resources healthy.

40 minutes
5

3 / 4
Science

The purpose of this lesson is to help students gain awareness of the many ways they use water daily and to get them thinking about how they might conserve water.

55 minutes
5

3 / 4
Science

In this lesson, students learn where Earth’s water resources are located, the difference between freshwater and salt water, and how much water is available for human use. The lesson challenges students to think critically about dwindling water supplies and their personal water-consumption habits.

Where is most of the water on Earth located?