Parents and Educators: find resources for at-home and distance learning

3

100 minutes
0

3 / 4
Arts, Science

In this lesson, students look closely at what a vehicle is and consider some of the incredible vehicles humans have invented to move us over land, through the air, and across or under the water. They look at key features of different types of vehicles and then work together on a group design challenge to innovate a new, exciting vehicle. By unpacking and then applying their understanding of what makes a vehicle move, students use teamwork and collaboration to produce inspiring new designs.

What is matter?
45 minutes
0

3 / 4
Science

In this lesson, students learn that we often encounter odor fatigue, i.e., we become accustomed to the smells around us after about 20 seconds of exposure, even when those smells are unpleasant or toxic. Students enjoy investigating different smells, and then engage in a thought-provoking discussion about how many smells that are familiar and may even be pleasant to us are actually toxic. They think about ways to “reset” their nose to do a better job of detecting indoor air pollution and brainstorm things they can do to reduce the number of indoor air pollutants at their homes.

What types of public spaces exist in my area?
100 minutes
5

3 / 4
Arts, Civics and Government, Reading or Language Arts

In this lesson, students go on a virtual tour, viewing examples of indoor and outdoor public spaces. Then they design and create an accordion book to tell a story about at least two indoor and two outdoor public spaces. Students then share their stories with each other to build awareness about and enjoyment of great community resources. The Extend activities get students thinking on a deeper level about the value of public spaces and the purposes they serve in the lives of individuals and communities.

There are so many foods to choose from. How can we make healthy choices?
40 minutes
0

3 / 4
Civics and Government, Reading or Language Arts

In this lesson, students listen to a reading of the popular folktale “Stone Soup.” They then reflect on what the story says about the importance of food and sharing, to communities and cultures. Next, they practice self-reflection as they examine their own food preferences and how they came to form those preferences. In a variety of rich extension opportunities, students demonstrate how they can use food to share of themselves and to enrich their local and global communities.

70 minutes
0

3 / 4
Science

In this lesson, students learn the difference between renewable and nonrenewable energy. They explore examples of each type of energy, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each. Then students apply what they’ve learned by creating a model of a windmill that can convert wind—a renewable energy source—to mechanical energy. They use the windmill to accomplish work, and then they experiment with and reflect upon ways in which we can take advantage of renewable energy resources.

Where does energy come from?
50 minutes
0

3 / 4
Science

In this lesson, students learn about the greenhouse effect and how excessive greenhouse warming on a global scale is affecting weather patterns around the world. They create solar boxes to simulate normal and excessive greenhouse effects and discuss how temperature is dependent upon environmental conditions. Students also explore how human activities that generate energy have contributed to these changes and how limiting our use of fossil fuels and promoting alternative energies can help address this problem. The lesson ends with students detailing and sharing ways we can all help reverse climate change for a more sustainable future.