10

100 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Civics and Government, History

Lessons 3 and 4 critically examine the basic concepts and rules of our constitutional democracy, focusing on its inherent weaknesses and the intergenerational work needed to defend against abuses of power. (150 minutes)

In Lesson 3, students critically examine the conceptual framework of the Constitution and Bill of Rights to understand the internal threats from inherent weaknesses in human nature that were institutionalized in these documents and in the Civil War Amendments. Students are introduced to a third entity that existed at the time of founding – artificial persons as corporations – and then explore the young government’s dilemma of where to fit this entity into the conceptual framework. Using Socratic method in small groups, students critically examine key legal changes and their social consequences on the balance of power during the first 160 years of the democracy journey. (100 minutes)

50 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Civics and Government, History

Lesson 5 explores a game-changing action in real time: How to amend the U.S. Constitution to defend against current injuries and usurpations of human rights and to restore rule to the (human) people. Students review the constitutional amendment process, then consider ways to address an internal threat to democracy by amendment. Using films and interactive activities, students evaluate proposed amendments and consider social consequences with, and without, such an amendment. Students reflect on how the amendment process influences social progress, then discuss whether the Supreme Court should be made more democratic and ways this could be achieved.

50 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Civics and Government, History

Lessons 3 and 4 critically examine the basic concepts and rules of our constitutional democracy, focusing on its inherent weaknesses and the intergenerational work needed to defend against abuses of power. (150 minutes)

In Lesson 4, students continue to explore the democracy journey, starting with people’s movements for civil liberties and civil rights during the 1950s to 1970s. Students are introduced to the Powell Memo of 1971 and the strategic legal campaign, organized by the Monied Power, to influence political campaign outcomes. Students explore the landmark laws and social consequences that resulted from this still-ongoing campaign and then reflect on the democracy journey, creating their own narrative of who rules.

100 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Civics and Government

Lesson 2 introduces a basic tool of civic engagement – the concept that our rights, and the government created to secure our rights, is derived from what we value and love. Students explore and articulate what they value, then examine how the value-based principles enshrined in the Declaration of Independence were moved into legal protections through the Bill of Rights and 14th Amendment. Based on personal values and current events that they care about, students prepare statements of injuries and usurpations of their rights, to learn how, and how well, our rights work to defend our wealth and wellbeing against government abuses of power. This lesson is critical to sustaining effective action on any issue.

200 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Civics and Government

Lesson 6 explores a game-changing action in real time – how to use our rights to defend against government abuses of power and to establish new rights to a healthy atmosphere and stable climate system. Students consider why people seek judicial relieve and examine basic elements of a civil lawsuit, drawing on real examples from the youth-driven landmark climate cases in federal and state courts. Students explore: “standing” in a court of law; how protected classes and new rights are recognized; rights under the Public Trust Doctrine; and more. Students gain an understanding of how values, law, science, and politics interface when addressing complex public problems with multiple perspectives.

50 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Civics and Government

Lesson 1 introduces students to a basic tool of civic engagement: how to turn passion and ideas into organized, effective game-changing action plans. Using short videos and stories about their peers who are organizing for climate justice, students analyze, identify, and discuss the basic elements of SMART action plans. Peer learning and interactive exercises nurture self-efficacy and support the role of young citizens in creating a more sustainable and democratic society.

Do you believe that you have the power to change the world?
60 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Geography, Reading or Language Arts, Social Studies

Children across the globe share similarities in their daily lives despite differences in cultures, religions, and locations.

60 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Arts, Geography, Social Studies

Architectural sites provide an important window into ancient cultures. Angkor Wat, an architectural treasure in the heart of Cambodia, reflects a civilization that integrated culture, nature, and religion, but the impacts of tourism threaten its future.

60 minutes
0

9 / 10 / 11 / 12
Economics, Environmental Education, Geography, Reading or Language Arts, Social Studies

Residents of Flint, Michigan, have been facing a water crisis since 2014, caused by poor decision-making by state government regarding the source and treatment of Flint’s drinking water. The crisis calls into question citizens’ rights to clean water and how our natural resources are allocated across racial and income lines.